A Few Tears at the End of the Year

Let us step outside for a moment
As the sun breaks through clouds
And shines on wet new fallen snow,
And breathe the new air.
So much has died that had to die this year.

Let us step outside for a moment.
It is all there
Only we have been slow to arrive
At a way of seeing it.
Unless the gentle inherit the earth
There will be no earth.
~May Sarton from “New Year Poem”

photo by Nate Gibson

Whenever you find tears in your eyes, especially unexpected tears, it is well to pay the closest attention.  They are not only telling you something about the secret of who you are, but more often than not God is speaking to you through them of the mystery of where you have come from and is summoning you to where, if your soul is to be saved, you should go next.
~Frederick Buechner
from Beyond Words

I don’t pay close enough attention to the meaning of my leaking eyes when I’m constantly looking for kleenex to stem the flow.  During the holidays it seems I have more than ample opportunity to find out from my tears the secret of who I am, where I have come from, and where I am to be next, so I keep my pockets loaded with kleenex.

It mostly has to do with spending time with far-flung children and grandchildren for the holidays. It is about reading books and doing puzzles together and reminiscing about what has been and what could be. It is about singing grace together before a meal and choking on precious words of gratitude.  It certainly has to do with bidding farewell until we meet again — gathering them in for that final hug and then that letting-go part.

We urged and encouraged our children to go where their hearts told them they are needed and called to be, even if thousands of miles away from their one-time home on this farm.

I too was let go once and though I would try to look back, too often in tears, I learned to set my face toward the future.  It led me here, to this marriage, this family, this farm, this work, our church, to more tears, to more letting go, as it will continue if I’m granted the years to weep again and again with gusto and grace.

This is where I must go next: to love so much and so deeply that letting go is so hard that tears are no longer unexpected or a mystery to me or my children and grandchildren.   They release a fullness that can no longer be contained: God’s still small voice spills down my cheeks drop by drop like wax from a burning candle.

A wise and precious friend once told me that “our tears are God’s tears; to be bereft is the only way to become one with God.

So no kleenex needed with these tears.

I’ll let them flow as I let them go.

3 thoughts on “A Few Tears at the End of the Year

  1. Your words brought tears to my own eyes, tears that seem to spring up with greater frequency as I get older. Life is so tender, so beautiful, and so sad, that it is nearly unbearable at times. Blessings to you in the new year, dear Emily. Thank you for sharing your thoughts, your images, and your heart with your readers.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Letting one’s tears flow is a healthy grace-filled release of frustration, hurts and sorrows in our life, and guilt over our human nature with its sinful shortcomings that wound others. We are then able to mentally, physically and, especially, spiritually start over, re-focus. Our eyes are washed clean of impurities enabling us to see more clearly, our heart releases pent up animosity caused by pettiness for small hurts and for painful losses and failures that are part of our Journey. In effect we begin to strongly recognize the healing that takes place within our souls where the Indwelling Spirit of our faithful loving God is with us, as Jesus promised us.

    Liked by 1 person

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