The Rhythm of Remembrance

My father, a WWII Lieutenant Colonel Marine and commanding officer who served for almost three years straight in the South Pacific, would never talk about his life during the war. Despite not knowing what he saw and endured, I will remember his and others’ service with gratitude.

Barnstorming

“For in self-giving, if anywhere, we touch a rhythm not only of all creation but of all being.”
C.S. Lewis

I’m unsure why the United States does not call November 11 Remembrance Day as the rest of the Commonwealth nations did after WWI. This is a day that demands much more than the more passive name Veterans’ Day represents.

This day calls all citizens who appreciate their freedoms to stop what they are doing and disrupt the routine rhythm of their lives. We are to remember in humble thankfulness the generations of military veterans who sacrificed time, resources, sometimes health and well being, and too often their lives in answering the call to defend their countries.

Remembrance means never forgetting what it costs to defend freedom. It means acknowledging the millions who have given of themselves and continue to do so on our behalf. It means never ceasing to care…

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One thought on “The Rhythm of Remembrance

  1. Amen. I am the proud sister of three U.S. Marines, the youngest of whom served in Vietnam and saw action in the TET offensive. To this day he will not talk about it — even when his tongue was loosened by a few beers. Very rarely do ‘civilians’ understand the comradship and unity that exists among our warriors. Their experiences are indelibly etched on their minds and souls forever. How we treated our returning warriors of the Vietnam era is a national disgrace. We forget that most of them were drafted and did not enlist voluntarily. We still have not been told the truth about why we were in Vietnam, Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan, and all the other ‘wars’ for which our country has provided money, arms and manpower. Thankfully, our current warriors are being welcomed home with honor and appreciation for their sacrifices.

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